Useful Tips for the Selection of a Plastics Granulator

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There’s been consistent growth of demand for granulation and size reduction. On the other hand, a granulator is used to cut and reduce the size of plastic fragments into smaller granules that are more manageable. The output granules may then be employed in other plastic processes or offered for sale in the open market. It’s in your best interest to pick the best machine when looking for a granulator as it can guarantee effective management of materials costs, facilitate the generation of recycled content, and increase your profits.

Here are some essential considerations in the selection of a granulator for chopping scrap plastics:
Know Your Application

The first thing that should come to your mind when selecting the appropriate granulating machine is your intended application. Firstly, define the material in relation to the amount of it you need granulated to size and the bulkiness of the scrap parts. The physical size and form of the parts are critical to identify. Next, turn to the material itself. Different polymers don’t always exhibit identical reactions, and the reactions of PVC and glass-reinforced plastic are not the same as those for polypropylene. And when you’re utilizing a number of feed streams, it is important to assign them percentages. When you’re handling roughly 95% sprues and runners in addition to the sporadic purgings, it’ll be more effective to have a solution for your sprues and runners while allocating another system for the purge. In the world of granulation, it’s impossible to find an perfectly all in one machine, and the use of one solution for all materials can lead to operational inefficiency as well as additional costs over the long term. With that said, understanding all important aspects of your application and materials will help determine the right kind of rotor, size of chamber, and amount of horsepower required to do the job perfectly well. Learn more about auger granulator, go here.

A Look at Granulator Parts

In the selection of your granulator, the rotor is one of the most essential components to take into account. You may prefer an open rotor for processing fragments with slim walls. The open concept lets materials flow effectively. The best for large, thick scraps is a closed rotor design, while a staggered rotor, which has more cuts for each revolution, is a hybrid of the other two designs.

You may also consider the type of engagement between the fly knife and bed knife because it has a relationship with horsepower requirements. The two knives are offset to produce a scissor cut. A granulator may have two bed knives, although some machines may have three or four to enhancing cutting action. Also, consider chamber size and shape, of which can affect the size of cuts the knives can make with each action. Take a look at this link http://www.ehow.com/how_4855169_start-plastic-recycling-business.html for more information.

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